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Successful people are rarely satisfied // They just set the bar higher and higher

"You put your heart and soul [into something], and it comes out, and it does as well as it can possibly do, and then you realize that you feel the same. Like, 'Oh, shouldn't this 10 years of incredibly hard work and achievement have made me feel different?'

I don't think you ever feel like, 'I've gotten there.' I think the dangling carrot keeps moving. Part of human nature is this masochistic instinct to constantly narrow the criteria of success so that you're just outside of it." - Jason Segel

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Demolition experts // They know how to take things apart

"Books are fine if they inspire you to write. But learning to write from a book written by someone who is dissecting screenplays is a little like listening to demolitions experts to learn about architecture: They know how to take things apart, but that doesn't mean they know how to build them. You can only really learn that by doing. So do it. A lot. Get scripts of your favorite movies or TV shows, read them, learn their format, then write your own."

-Alec Berg, Writer/Producer/Director: Silicon Valley, Seinfeld, Curb Your Enthusiasm

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Destruction and Rebirth happen // the Simple Safety Zone

“It’s simple. There’s still a safety zone, but it’s not in a place that feels comfortable to you. The new safety zone is the place where art and innovation and destruction and rebirth happen. The new safety zone is the never-ending creation of ever-deeper personal connection.”

-The Icarus Deception

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Failure sucks // Failure is a sign of actionable goals

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Failure sucks // Failure is a sign of actionable goals

"Failure sucks. Failing feels like someone punched you and your dream in the face. But, failure is a sign of action. If you never experience failure, it means you aren't taking the kind of action you need to accomplish your loftiest goals."

-Quote by Kimanzi Constable from KimanziConstable.com

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Persuasion past argumentation // the subject they don't want you to get to

Maybe it's a universal truth that arguments create fixations in the minds of people, and agreements get you to move on to the next topic. The last thing you want to do is let a cantankerous person be fixated on something you need him to move past. So agreeing with him will make him let it go.

Sometimes when people want to avoid the important things you've come to talk about, they'll bring up something controversial to bait you into an argument. Why? Because they know the longer you spend in fixation with this, the less time you'll take on the next subject // the subject they don't want you to get to.

Knowing how to avoid arguments, keeps you in control of the conversation.

A good example of this comes from the legendary Dale Carnegie: How To Win Friends & Influence People.

"Mr. O'Haire became one of the star salesmen for the White Motor Company in New York. In his own words: 'If I walk into a buyer's office now and he says: "What? A White truck? They're no good! I wouldn't take one if you gave it to me. I'm going to buy the Whose-It truck," I say, "The Whose-It is a good truck. If you buy the Whose-It, you'll never make a mistake. The Whose-Its are made by a fine company and sold by good people."

He is speechless then. There is no room for an argument. If he says the Whose-It is best and I say sure it is, he has to stop. He can't keep on all afternoon saying, "It's the best" when I'm agreeing with him. We then get off the subject of Whose-It and I begin to talk about the good points of the White Truck.

There was a time when a remark like his first one would have made me see scarlet and red and orange. I would start arguing against the Whose-It; and the more I argued against it, the more my prospect argued in favor of it; and the more he argued, the more he sold himself on my competitor's product.'

Mr. O'Haire and Dale Carnegie realized that the person who uses argumentative bait, controls the conversation, until you walk right past it. Once you've left it behind, you can begin to talk about the important things again. Now YOU'RE back in control again.

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Risk-thinking // the worst year of my life was the year I knew I was going to be successful

Probably 75% of the articles on Entrepreneurship and creativity are positive messages with little substance. Everybody seems to want to be encouraged and reassured.

The problem is, I just don't think that this - entrepreneurship - is the kind of area where you deal with predictable variables. Entrepreneurship is the kind of career where you need to learn how to find your way in the dark.

The saddest thing about business success stories is how misleading the path backwards looks, when we can see each step of the way clearly, but forget that for a normal person going forward, all of those steps were amongst dozens of other choices they made that ended up going nowhere, or were mediocre––or were absolute failures.

The path forward feels more like you don't know for certain what consequences will come of your actions. You have to make blind decisions and wait for the results.

And when you've made it, everybody looks at the decision before the result and thinks it must have been easy to know how much you were going to achieve from that decision, but I don't think it's ever easy. If it were easy, it probably wouldn't have such fantastic results.

Taking calculated risks is the foundation of all entrepreneurs and business owners. And you have to be prepared to live with the results of those risks.

The worst year of my life - the lowest point - was the year I knew I was going to be successful. I wasn't successful that year, but in the midst of my biggest feeling of disappointment and failure, I realized I could survive the consequences of my risks... and I didn't have to be afraid anymore.

Things were going to go wrong, but I was going to figure out how to survive it. And eventually, nothing would be left to stop me from succeeding.

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Creating jobs // no government, neither ours nor theirs, can create jobs

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Creating jobs // no government, neither ours nor theirs, can create jobs

"Since the market crash that began in 2007, the biggest crash since the Great Depression, many have been waiting for the economy to come back. … The problem is that no government, neither ours nor theirs, can cause real jobs.

Only entrepreneurs can do that. Only entrepreneurs can see the future and bring it to life – risking, losing, and winning – over and over. In the process, they create new industries and opportunities for people all over the world.

Schools are designed to create employees. That is why people say, “Go to school to get a good job.” Most students, even graduates of MBA programs, go on to become employees, not entrepreneurs. Millions of students leave school each year saddled with massive student-loan debt, unable to find jobs. Today, too many people, young and old, are looking for jobs, or are afraid of losing their jobs.

We need more entrepreneurs who can create businesses and jobs." -Robert T. Kiyosaki & Donald J. Trump

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